Health and Healing Benefits of Dandelion Root

Updated on May 19, 2018
cloverleaffarm profile image

My love of nature led me down the path to herbs and herbal healing. I became a medical herbalist in 2002.

Source

Did you know dandelions have been used for hundreds of years as a spring tonic? During the winter months, food was limited to meat and root vegetables. But when spring came, people would eat the early spring dandelion greens to detox their bodies from the winter's "sludge" that had built up in their livers.

Don't mow dandelions but instead grow them for their terrific herbal medicinal benefits. The young leaves can be used in salads while the flowers can be made into syrup. The whole plant is useful, right down to the sap it produces, which can be used to treat warts.

Dandelion root from two-year-old plants. Root can be dried for later use.
Dandelion root from two-year-old plants. Root can be dried for later use. | Source

What Are the Health Benefits of Dandelion Root?

Vitamins and Minerals Found in the Root

  • Vitamin A, Vitamin B complex, and Vitamin C—all important for good heart health
  • Vitamin D
  • Zinc
  • Iron
  • Potassium

Health Benefits

  • The root is an herbal bitter and, therefore, used as a liver tonic. It helps to cleanse the bile ducts and promote healthy digestion.
  • It's one of the most detoxifying herbs. It mainly works on the liver and gallbladder to promote removal of waste products. It also encourages the steady elimination of toxins due to infection or pollution.
  • Research conducted in 1974 confirmed the roots and leaves are a powerful natural diuretic due to their potassium content. This can help clean out the kidneys and promote proper kidney function. Other over-the-counter diuretics deplete potassium, which is very harmful to the body.
  • It is used by herbalists to prevent gallstones.
  • It can help with occasional constipation since it is considered a natural laxative. It is usually combined with other laxative herbs, depending on the severity.
  • It's very useful for treating skin conditions such as acne and eczema. Using a tincture or salve made with dandelion can help both skin conditions.
  • Drink a cup of dandelion root tea to help promote cleansing from the inside as well.
  • In 1999, a study in Japan showed that dandelion could be used as an anti-cancer agent.

Medical Disclaimer

People taking blood-thinning medications should not use dandelion leaves. If you are allergic to dandelions, stay clear.

This article only represents an overview. Do not self-diagnose; consult a healthcare professional well-versed in herbs before self-treating. Herbs are natural but can interact with other medicines, as well as other herbs.

Dandelion root powder can be made into a tea or put into capsules.
Dandelion root powder can be made into a tea or put into capsules. | Source

How to Use Dandelion Root

  • If you have chunks of a root, or what is called cut and sifted, you will have to make a decoction, not a tea. A tea would not extract enough of the medicinal benefits.
  • You could also make a tincture with dandelion root (either fresh or dried).
  • For dandelion root powder, you can make a tea using a cotton tea bag. Use 1 teaspoon per coffee-sized cup of water. Add honey or your favorite sweetener. You can also buy dandelion already bagged. It is sold in most health food stores.

How Do You Dry Dandelion Root?

  1. You can either buy dandelion root or dig it up and dry it yourself.
  2. After collecting the roots, wash them thoroughly.
  3. Slice or cut them into small pieces and put them on a cookie sheet.
  4. Bake in the oven on a very low temp for several hours until dry. Alternatively, you can use a dehydrator set between 95-105 degrees Fahrenheit
  5. .Be sure they are completely dry, otherwise, mold can occur.
  6. Store in paper bags or sealed glass jars. Do not use plastic since the plastic can leach into the root.

How to Make Coffee Using a Dandelion Root

Dandelion root makes a very earthy-tasting coffee. It can be drunk alone or added to your favorite coffee mix.

  1. Powder or crush the herb in a blender since it's best to get it to a coffee-like texture.
  2. To roast it, bake on a medium temperature, around 300 degrees. Stir and shake often. Don't let it burn, as this will taste awful and ruin the herb. Time will vary depending on your oven.
  3. Roast until brown. Let it cool, and then store in a glass jar out of sunlight, which will destroy the properties.

Have you ever tried dandelion coffee?

See results

Growing Dandelions

Dandelions grow wild in most parts of the world. Germany and France cultivate them for medicinal use around the world. The plant is propagated from seed in spring. You can also allow it to go to seed and let nature take its course. The root of two-year-old plants is pulled in autumn and dried. Plants that are too young do not contain the key constituents of the mature plant.

Interested in growing your own? It is very easy. Get some seeds from a reputable seed company. We prefer buying ours at Johnny's Seeds. They are of great quality, and we have had good luck with both their herbs seeds as well as their veggie seeds.

If you don't plant by seed, you can just allow the ones in your yard to go to seed every year. Your lawn will become a beautiful sea of yellow in just a couple of years.

© 2012 Healing Herbalist

Comments

Submit a Comment

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 5 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    lorddraven2000, thanks for stopping by. Dandelion Root tea is a great tea. It has a bit of an earthy taste. It has great healing benefits, and I hope you like it.

  • lorddraven2000 profile image

    Sam Little 5 years ago from Wheelwright KY

    I have always wanted to try this type of tea but never really got around to it. It seems I should really consider making time. Very interesting work here. Thanks.

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 5 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Thanks for stopping by, sarahshuihan. Dandelion is a great detox for eczema. Let me know what you think of it.

  • sarahshuihan profile image

    Sarah 5 years ago from USA

    This is a great hub! I've been thinking about drinking dandelion tea to help with my eczema and after reading this I think I will! very useful :)

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 5 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Sam, thanks for stopping by. Nature is amazing, isn't it!

  • profile image

    Sam 5 years ago

    Wow, who would have known that a dandelion is so good for you. Thanks for sharing all the great information.

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 5 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Hi Katie, thanks for stopping by. It is a "weed" to most people, but is has so many health benefits. Have a great day.

  • profile image

    Katie 5 years ago

    Yes here in Canada it is a weed!!! We spray to get rid if it. But we go and buy it to drink!! To funny!

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 5 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Hello Maraiya Storm, thanks for stopping by and reading. If you can't find the root in tea bags, you could buy the root, roast it and grind it yourself. I do it all the time.

  • Maraiya Storm profile image

    Maraiya Storm 5 years ago from Prescott, Arizona

    Thanks for reminding me about dandelion. A long time ago I used to buy a jar of dandelion root coffee substitute and felt it had an energizing effect on me. Then they stopped making it so I stopped. I'm going to check for dandelion root tea bags at the health food store and start back on it. You give lots of great information here on how to do it yourself, too. I'm going to bookmark this page.

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 6 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Hello m0rd0r, dandelion greens in a salad is really good, and good for you. It isn't such a bad habit to have. Thanks for stopping by. It is always nice to see you.

  • m0rd0r profile image

    Stoill Barzakov 6 years ago from Sofia, Bulgaria

    CLF, I've had a habbit to make sallad from dandellion stems and leaves and it is quite good.

    I can't vote UP two times in a row, so ... you know I did in my head. ;)

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 6 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Hello beingwell. Thanks for stopping by. Glad to find another tea lover out there in the world. Thanks for the votes, and have a great day.

  • beingwell profile image

    beingwell 6 years ago from Bangkok

    I enjoy drinking tea. We have chamomile, jasmine, oolong, jiaogulan, etc., etc... tea at home. I have tried dandelion root tea though. Thanks for the info.

    Voted up!

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 6 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Glad you enjoyed. I teach a class on local wild edibles, and people are always amazed. I did a hub about it too. I have an article for dandelion syrup too.

  • DeborahNeyens profile image

    Deborah Neyens 6 years ago from Iowa

    This is very interesting. I'm working on an article about wild edibles for an on-line column I have on another site and just talked with a wild edible expert the other day. His favorite wild edible is dandelion and he uses the leaves, flowers and roots in cooking. He sent me a number of recipes. I'm actually going to give some of them a try.

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 6 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Thanks, Rufus. Everything in moderation is key. Coffee is okay, if you don't over do. Thanks for reading.

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 6 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    I have never eaten it raw, but you can roast it on it's own and drink it like a coffee. Just grind in a coffee grinder and make however you do your coffee. Thanks for stopping by.

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 6 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Thank you Peggy. You'll have to read my hub on Wild Edibles. Dandelion "mushrooms" are awesome., Oh, how I love to lay in a field of dandelions.

  • Rufus rambles profile image

    Rufus rambles 6 years ago from Australia

    Great hub! I absolutely love Dandelion tea. It feels so much healthier than drinking coffee. Thanks and voted up!

  • Ben Zoltak profile image

    Ben Zoltak 6 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

    A great hub on dandelions. I use the leaves in jambalaya, still haven't tried the root. Can it be eaten raw or roasted on it's own? Or does it need to be in a tea only?

    Thanks, well done.

    Ben

  • Peggy W profile image

    Peggy Woods 6 years ago from Houston, Texas

    We had dandelions growing in our Wisconsin half acre yard years ago and I had heard about eating the leaves and roots. Made quite a few salads using them. Very interesting hub! Voted that + up and useful and will share with my followers.

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 6 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Thanks for stopping by, and voting up. Have a great day.

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 6 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Here in the US, everyone tries to destroy it. They only know it as a weed, and try to get rid of it. We just mow around them...lol.

  • cloverleaffarm profile image
    Author

    Healing Herbalist 6 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

    Hi seattlegirl, I am glad you liked it.

  • clairemy profile image

    Claire 6 years ago

    I use herbal and traditional remedies so shall add this to the list.

    Voted up and interesting.

  • m0rd0r profile image

    Stoill Barzakov 6 years ago from Sofia, Bulgaria

    Very good article.

    Do you know, that in some cultures Dandelions are rooted and destroyed like an abusive weed?

  • theseattlegirl profile image

    theseattlegirl 6 years ago from Seattle, WA

    I love this article! Thank you for taking the time to put this together. I feel infinitely more informed on this subject! In fact, I think I may have to go stock up on dandelion root ASAP!

working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, remedygrove.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://remedygrove.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)